Beneficial outcome from EEG-neurofeedback on creative music performance, attention and well-being in school children

We earlier reported benefits for creativity in rehearsed music performance from alpha/theta (A/T) neurofeedback in conservatoire studies (Egner & Gruzelier, 2003) which were not found with SMR, Beta1, mental skills, aerobics or Alexander training, or in standby controls. Here the focus was the impact on novice music performance. A/T and SMR training were compared in 11-year old school children along with non-intervention controls with outcome measures not only of rehearsed music performance but also of creative improvisation, as well as sustained attention and phenomenology. Evidence of effective learning in the school setting was obtained for A/T and SMR/beta2 ratios. Preferential benefits from A/T for rehearsed music performance were replicated in children for technique and communication ratings. Benefits extended to creativity and communication ratings for creative improvisation which were shared with SMR training, disclosing an influence of SMR on unrehearsed music performance at a novice level with its greater cognitive demands. In a first application of A/T for improving sustained attention (TOVA), it was found to be more successful than SMR training, with a notable reduction in commission errors in the children, 15/33 of whom had attention indices in the ADHD range. Phenomenological reports were in favour of neurofeedback and well-being benefits. Implementing neurofeedback in the daily school setting proved feasible and holds pedagogic promise.

Kategorien: ADHD in children, Therapy, Cognitive training

Typ:Originalarbeit
Autor:J.H. Gruzelier, M. Foks, T. Steffert, M.J.-L. Chen, T. Ros
Quelle:Biological Psychology, 95, 2014, 86-95
Jahr:2014
Keywords (deutsch):---
Keywords (englisch):Neurofeedback, Alpha/theta, SMR, School children, Music, Creativity, Attention, Well-being
DOI:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.04.005